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Startups Vie to Build an Uber for Health Care
The Wall Street Journal

Darren Gold had a stomach virus the first time he used an app called Heal to summon a doctor to his Beverly Hills home. He liked the Stanford-trained doctor who showed up so much that he called Heal again when his 2-year-old son had a fever, and again when the whole family had colds.

The charges — $99 each for the first two visits; $200 for the family — weren’t covered by insurance, but Mr. Gold, who owns a corrugated-box company, says that was still a bargain compared with taking time off work to go to the doctor. “Now, whenever my son bumps himself, he says, ‘Daddy, we need to get the doctor here’,” Mr. Gold says.

Heal is one of several startups putting a high-tech spin on old-fashioned house calls — or “in-person visits,” since they can take place anywhere. The services provide a range of nonemergency medical care — from giving flu shots to treating strep throats and stitching lacerations — much like a mobile urgent-care clinic.

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