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Stanford doctor on a mission to empower patients to talk about end-of-life issues
SCOPE

Each year, about 2.6 million people die in America. Although past research has shown that 7 out of 10 of us prefer to die at home, an estimated 70 percent of people die in the hospital, nursing home or long-term care facility. The disconnect between where people die and how they would prefer to spend their final days often happens because loved ones and doctors don’t know their end-of-life wishes. Only 20 to 30 percent of Americans have completed advanced directives.

It’s not easy to talk about death, and the terminology used in advanced directives can be confusing. I remember having to complete the form with my husband shortly before the birth of my first child. Despite having been in a relationship for 12 year, we had never discussed end-of-life issues. Imagining the scenarios that might lead to either of us being in a life-threatening situation was an extremely emotional exercise — especially as we awaited our son’s arrival. Did we want doctors to use every intervention possible to save our life? What if it meant sacrificing our quality of life? Did we want to be on life support? If so, how long?

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