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Consumers In ‘Grandfathered’ Health Plans Can Face Higher Costs
National Public Radio

Judy Naillon called her insurer several months ago to find out why she was being charged $35 every month for birth control pills. Her friends said they were getting their pills free under the federal health law.

Why wasn’t she getting the same deal?

The insurance representative explained that was because the plan Naillon and her husband had through his job was “grandfathered” under the health law.  In other words, unlike other health plans, Naillon’s insurance policy, which existed before the health law was enacted, doesn’t have to cover many preventive services, including contraception.

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