Education event

Disaster Planning for California Hospitals
Building Critical Connections

September 19 – 21, 2011
Sacramento, CA

 

Overview

Connect with your colleagues at the largest gathering of hospital emergency preparedness coordinators in California. We’ll explore new approaches and solutions that evolve from real-life crises — from the devastating tornadoes that struck Missouri to the 9.0 earthquake, tsunami and nuclear disaster that ravaged Japan.

Build critical skills to strengthen your hospital’s preparedness and response. Choose the topics that matter most to you from our extensive line-up of breakout sessions. Register today to attend this important annual event!

September 19 – 20: Conference Sessions
September 21: Active Shooter Post-Conference Workshop

Agenda at a Glance

Monday, September 19

7:30 – 8:30 a.m. 
Registration, Continental Breakfast, Exhibits and Best Practices

8:30 a.m. – Noon | Opening Keynotes

  • Catastrophe Strikes Japan: What Can We Learn?
  • The Joplin Story
  • Leveraging Social Media
  • Update on State Initiatives

Noon – 1:15 p.m. | Opening Lunch

1:30 – 3:00 p.m. | Concurrent Breakout Sessions (choose one)

  • Minnesota’s Evacuation Template and Tools 
  • Pediatric Surge Planning: The Kaiser Permanente Experience
  • Essentials of an Emergency Management Program
  • Surge OC: Integrating Health Care Response into Community Preparedness

3:00 – 3:30 p.m. | Exhibit Show and Best Practices

3:30 – 5:00 p.m. | Concurrent Breakout Sessions (choose one)

  • Partnering with Community Health Centers & Clinics
  • Loss of Water and Power, Care Must Go On
  • Evacuating the NICU
  • FIRE! The Evacuation of Garfield Medical Center

5:00 – 6:30 p.m. | Exhibit Show Reception and Best Practices

Tuesday, September 20

7:45 –8:45 a.m.
Exhibit Show, Best Practices and Continental Breakfast

8:45 –9:45 a.m. | The Johns Hopkins Shooting

9:45 – 10:30 a.m. | Exhibit Show and Grand Prize Drawing

10:30 a.m. – Noon | Concurrent Breakout Sessions (Choose one)

  • Preparing for the Big One – Lessons from the Loma Prieta Earthquake
  • Assessing Pediatric Preparedness – Evaluation of a Multi-Hospital Disaster Drill
  • TRAIN: Triaging Resource Allocation for Inpatient Movement
  • Protecting Health Care Delivery by Expanding the Continuity Function
  • Essentials of an Emergency Management Program (repeated from earlier)

Noon – 1:15 p.m. | Hosted Lunch

1:30 – 3:00 p.m. | Concurrent Breakout Sessions (Choose one)

  • HICS and Employee Recovery – A Solution for Hospitals
  • Hospital Disaster Management Training (HDMT) 
  • Pediatric Surge Planning for Hospitals and Clinics
  • TRAIN: Triaging Resource Allocation for Inpatient Movement (repeated from earlier)

3:15 – 4:15 p.m. | Statewide Medical and Health Exercise Update

Wednesday, September 21

7:30 – 8:30 p.m. | Registration and Continental Breakfast

8:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. | Post-Conference Workshop: Active Shooter — Steps to Mitigate Harm

The post-conference workshop has sold out.  

Conference Meeting Location: Sacramento Convention Center

The conference and the exhibit show will be held at the Sacramento Convention Center, located just across the street from the host hotel, the Hyatt Regency Sacramento. The post-conference workshop on Wednesday, Sept. 21, will be held at the Hyatt Regency.

Co-sponsored by:

California Department of Public Health
California Emergency Management Agency
Emergency Medical Services Authority

Monday Agenda

Monday, September 19

7:30 – 8:30 a.m
Registration, Continental Breakfast, Exhibits and Best Practices

8:30 a.m. – Noon | Opening Keynotes

Catastrophe Strikes Japan: What Can We Learn?
Kozue Shimabukuro, MD, Pediatric Critical Care Fellow, Mattel Children’s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, University of California Los Angeles
Hear the riveting story of a UCLA pediatric critical care doctor who grew up in Japan and returned to her home country within days of the 9.0 quake, tsunami and nuclear crisis. Joining a government pediatric team, Dr. Shimabukuro spent three weeks scouring the area north of Tokyo for survivors. Makeshift hospitals were in chaos, and doctors were working five-day shifts without sleep. The challenges were great including the lack of communication, ability to transport patients and medical staff, and access to medicine in doses appropriate for children. Learn how Japan’s extensive disaster training increased the survival rate in some areas and consider how these lessons apply to California.

The Joplin Story
Robert W. Dodson, MD, FACS, FASCRS, Trauma Director and President of the Medical Staff, St. John’s Regional Medical Center, Joplin, MO
With only minutes of warning, St. John’s Medical Center in Joplin, Missouri was pummeled by one of the deadliest tornadoes in the nation’s history. Glass shards exploded from every window, doors blew open, and patients’ IV lines were ripped from their arms. The hospital was nearly totally destroyed. Yet one week later, St. John’s was again caring for patients using a 60-bed, high-tech field hospital with access to the hospital’s new electronic health records system. Hear the remarkable story of resiliency and take away ideas to apply at your hospital.

Leveraging Social Media
Sara Estes Cohen, MPP, ABCP, Project Manager, G&H International Services, Inc.
Learn how Facebook, Twitter, blogs and RSS feeds can enhance traditional crisis communications in a disaster. Discover how hospitals and public agencies can use social media successfully and to the fullest potential both during a disaster and to enhance recovery. Find out about good sources of rapid information, new advancements, and how to avoid privacy issues and other pitfalls.

Update on State Initiatives
Susan Fanelli, Assistant Deputy Director, Public Health Emergency Preparedness, California Department of Public Health (Invited)

Noon – 1:15 p.m. | Opening Lunch

1:30 – 3:00 p.m. | Concurrent Breakout Sessions (choose one)

Minnesota’s Evacuation Template and Tools
Don Sheldrew, MSW, LICSW, EMT-P, At-Risk Populations Planner, Minnesota Department of Health, Office of Emergency Preparedness, Health System Preparedness Unit
The evacuation of hospitals and nursing homes in Minnesota over the last few years have illustrated key deficiencies in evacuation planning and inconsistencies in terminology. This experience led to the development of a statewide evacuation template that standardized the format, terminology and decision-making for patient sheltering, relocation and evacuation. Benefit from these model tools which can be modified to fit any size and type of facility, and can be used by multiple providers in your community.

Pediatric Surge Planning: The Kaiser Permanente Experience
Susan Fitzgerald, MD, FAEM, Emergency Physician and Emergency Preparedness and Kristina Spurgeon, MPH, Threat Assessment Consultant, Program Office, Kaiser Permanente
Pediatric care during disasters is a growing concern among California hospitals. Learn about Kaiser Permanente’s pediatric surge model that includes methods for all levels of pediatric capacity – from hospitals with no inpatient pediatrics, to those with full NICU and PICU capability – and incorporates strategies to coordinate pediatric care across hospitals, communities and health care systems.

Essentials of an Emergency Management Program
Loni Howard, RN, MSN, Hospital Preparedness Coordinator, California Hospital Association and Emergency Preparedness Coordinator, Sutter Medical Center
Designed for those new to emergency preparedness, this session provides a “how to” approach on effective documentation of your Emergency Management Program and provides information on how to prepare for a Joint Commission survey. Learn ways to utilize the CHA Emergency Management Program Checklist to organize and write your Emergency Operations Plan and Emergency Management Program description. Bring your table of contents to compare and evaluate.

Surge OC: Integrating Health Care Response into Community Preparedness
Dorothy Hendrickson, Administrative Manager, Hospital Preparedness Program and Steve Serrao, MBBS, MPH, Planning Consultant, Orange County Health Care Agency; Mary Massey, RN, Hospital Preparedness Coordinator, California Hospital Association
The Orange County Health Care Agency launched “Surge OC,” an innovative initiative that leverages private and public sector expertise and nationally accepted response frameworks in a common sense approach to disaster planning. With the goal of building capacity at the local level, the plan provides strategies for system-wide preparedness amongst several different types of health care providers and identifies areas for collaboration.

3:00 – 3:30 p.m | Exhibit Show and Best Practices

3:30 – 5:00 p.m. | Concurrent Breakout Sessions (choose one)

 

Partnering with Community Health Centers & Clinics
Patrick Klein, MS, CHEP, Senior Program Coordinator, Emergency Preparedness, California Primary Care Association; Denise Highfill, ITS Help Desk Technician/Emergency Preparedness, Shasta Community Health Center; and Theresa Channell, RN, MICN, CEN, Shasta Regional Medical Center
Partnerships are key in a disaster. Learn how to expand and strengthen your response network by partnering with community health centers and clinics. Challenges faced by existing partner agencies and best practices established in Northern California will be presented along with techniques used for integrating new resource agreements into existing plans.

Loss of Water and Power, Care Must Go On
Dale White, CSO, Lead Senior Safety Management Specialist and Sharon Carlson, Director, Emergency Preparedness, Sharp HealthCare
A water main breaks in the loading dock area of your hospital causing complete loss of water, heat and steam. Before you know it, the electrical transformer unit is in danger of flooding and you must switch to emergency power. Hear how Sharp Memorial overcame these challenges while continuing to care for patients.

Evacuating the NICU
Jeremy Hadland, RN, Administrative Supervisor, Emergency Management Committee Chair and Lorraine Shields, RNC, MN, Clinical Nurse Specialist Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Salinas Valley Memorial Healthcare System; and Margo Reeves, RNC, Nurse Educator, Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and Karen Greeley, NICU Transport Team, Loma Linda University Children’s Hospital
How do you ensure an expeditious and safe evacuation for infants in the NICU? Two hospitals will share their best practices and staff training ideas for a systematic and safe Level III NICU evacuation. Considerations such as patient tracking, security, public relations concerns, ventilator dependent infants, equipment needs and more will be discussed. See the video of an 84-bed NICU evacuation exercise, which highlights innovative ways to prioritize and triage patients.

FIRE! The Evacuation of Garfield Medical Center
Phil Gour, Assistant Administrator Laboratory; Michelle Silverberg, RN, BSN, Nursing Supervisor and Alicia Telles, ICP, CIC, Infection Prevention Director, Garfield Medical Center
An electrical fire breaks out on the third floor of a four-story facility. Within minutes the fire is extinguished, but dense smoke makes it impossible to see and the fire department orders the evacuation of 98 patients. Learn how a hospital rallied to meet the needs of their patients — despite lack of oxygen, beds and toilets — and how area hospitals came to their aid.

5:00 – 6:30 p.m. | Exhibit Show Reception and Best Practices 
Mingle with colleagues, enjoy hors d’oeuvres, and learn about useful products and services that can help you with disaster preparedness and response.

Tuesday Agenda

Tuesday, September 20

7:45 – 8:45 a.m
Exhibit Show, Best Practices and Continental Breakfast

8:45 –9:45 a.m.
The Johns Hopkins Shooting
Howard Gwon, Senior Director, Office of Emergency Management, Johns Hopkins Health System and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine; and Gary M. Stephenson, Director, Media Relations & Public Affairs, Johns Hopkins Medicine
A shooting in a patient room at Johns Hopkins Hospital last year left two people dead and a doctor wounded. With the shooter located in the center of a busy, 14-building complex, find out how the hospital responded and how they used multiple avenues of communication — including social media — to get information out to families, staff and the community. Hear what changes the hospital has since made to their culture, policies and staff training.

 

9:45 – 10:30 a.m. | Exhibit Show and Grand Prize Drawing

10:30 a.m. – Noon | Concurrent Breakout Sessions (choose one)

Preparing for the Big One – Lessons from the Loma Prieta Earthquake
Lisa Angell, RN, BSN, Prehospital Care Coordinator, Pediatric Liaison Nurse and Staff Nurse IV, Watsonville Community Hospital and Hospital Preparedness Coordinator, California Hospital Association
Valuable lessons were learned from the 6.9 quake that rocked the Santa Cruz Mountains in 1989. Watsonville Community Hospital took a huge “hit” and had to be completely re-built. Find out what staff did to protect themselves during the shaking and how they balanced competing priorities with immediate areas of need once the tremors stopped. Learn no-cost actions you can take now that will make a difference when the next “big one” strikes California.

Assessing Pediatric Preparedness – Evaluation of a Multi-Hospital Disaster Drill
Bridget Berg, MPH, Program Manager, Pediatric Disaster Resource and Training Center, and Trauma Burn Surge Coordinator; Rita Burke, PhD, MPH, Senior Research Associate; and Jeffrey Upperman, MD, FACS, FAAP, Director, Pediatric Disaster Resource and Training Center, Children’s Hospital Los Angeles
Treating pediatric victims in a disaster will prove challenging for many hospitals. In May of 2011, three large urban hospitals in Los Angeles County held a joint disaster drill to test their pediatric disaster preparedness. This presentation will provide the tools necessary to develop metrics to evaluate pediatric disaster drill performance and identify gaps to improve pediatric disaster preparedness in your facility.

TRAIN: Triaging Resource Allocation for Inpatient Movement
Ronald Cohen, MD, Clinical Professor of Pediatrics, Director – PICN, Stanford University School of Medicine, Division of Neonatal and Developmental Pediatrics; Brandon Bond, MS, EMT, CBCP, Director, Office of Emergency Management, Stanford Hospital and Clinics and Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital; and Anna Lin, MD, Clinical Instructor of Pediatrics, Pediatrics Hospitalist, Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital, Stanford University School of Medicine
TRAIN is a newly developed triage protocol to assist in pre-planning based on six criteria designed to align the patient with the transportation resources required for evacuation to other hospitals. This presentation will discuss how TRAIN was developed and tested in the NICU environment and modified to be applicable for all pediatric inpatient units.

Protecting Health Care Delivery by Expanding the Continuity Function
Cheryl LaTouche, Business Continuity Manager and Dale Thompson, Threat Assessment Manager, Kaiser Permanente
Because of emergency management, patient care functions and services are able to respond appropriately – but even within these groups, there is limited appreciation of cross-functional dependencies on how to work as a team to properly prioritize and allocate resources during disruptions. This session provides an understanding of the challenges faced in deploying and sustaining a business continuity program for hospitals of all shapes and sizes and offer solutions.

Essentials of an Emergency Management Program (repeated from earlier)

Noon – 1:15 p.m. | Hosted Lunch

1:30 – 3:00 p.m. | Concurrent Breakout Sessions (choose one)

HICS and Employee Recovery – A Solution for Hospitals
JJ Burke, MS, EMT-I, Associate Director/Instructor, Boston University School of Medicine, Healthcare Emergency Management Program
Employee recovery is often an afterthought in many health care organizations. This can lead to mental health issues and loss of wages for affected employees, not to mention loss of time and money for employers. Based on research and exercises, this session examines how to implement and activate an Employee Recovery Branch into the HICS system for hospital events. Take home tools include job action sheets and an organizational chart for implementation into your hospital disaster plans.

Hospital Disaster Management Training (HDMT)
Jacqueline Rifenburg, RN, MICN, Disaster Resource Center Trauma & Burn Surge Program Manager, Los Angeles County Department of Health Services Emergency Medical Services Agency
Learn about an innovative and comprehensive training program that can be modified to fit any region in California. The HDMT course covers a wide variety of topics including CBRNE, triage, natural disasters and hospital command center activation. Course objectives, curriculum and agenda will be provided along with a detailed description of two functional exercises.

Pediatric Surge Planning for Hospitals and Clinics
Sue Cox, RN, MS, CPEN, PHN, Director of Trauma and Volunteer Service and Chris Abe, RN, BSN, CIC, HEM, Sr. Director of Ancillary and Support Services, Safety Officer, Rady Children’s Hospital
Children are not little adults and hospitals must plan to be able to meet the care needs in the event of a pediatric surge. This presentation will help hospitals identify pediatric triage strategies (including staffing and transfer criteria) and logistical needs (supplies, medications, equipment, facilities) to develop a plan to prepare hospitals and clinics for a pediatric surge.

TRAIN: Triaging Resource Allocation for Inpatient Movement (repeated from earlier)

 

3:15 – 4:15 p.m.
Statewide Medical and Health Exercise Update
Susan Fanelli, Assistant Deputy Director, Public Health Emergency Preparedness, California Department of Public Health
This year’s Statewide Medical and Health Exercise, set for November 17, is fast approaching. This is a great opportunity to get an update on the exercise and ask questions.

The conference ends at 4:15 p.m. on Tuesday.

Post-Conference Agenda

Wednesday, September 21

7:30 – 8:30 a.m | Registration and Continental Breakfast

8:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. | Post-Conference Workshop

Active Shooter — Steps to Mitigate Harm

This workshop has sold out and we can no longer accept any new registrations.

Workshop Facilitator:
Caryn Thornburg, Emergency Preparedness and HAZMAT, ValleyCare Health System

Faculty:
Howard Gwon, Senior Director, Office of Emergency Management, Johns Hopkins Health System and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Gary M. Stephenson, Director, Media Relations & Public Affairs, Johns Hopkins Medicine

Joey Hunter, Sr., Director of Public Safety and Emergency Management, St. Bernardine Medical Center

Therese Rymer, RN, C. FNP, COHN-S, MAS, Director, Emergency Preparedness & Response, UC San Diego Health System

Bret Bandick, Security Training Manager, UC San Diego Health System

Monique Imroth, Analyst, Emergency Preparedness & Response, UC San Diego Medical Center

Aviva Truesdell, Senior Vice President, AllHealth Security Services/Hospital Association of Southern California

The sheer thought of a gunman loose in a hospital or clinic is frightening, yet it has become a reality in California and across the nation. This workshop addresses key components of hospital active shooter preparedness and response including innovative ideas for developing or enhancing your plans and training your staff. Participants will hear valuable lessons from the Johns Hopkins shooting and a number of California facilities who will provide tips, tools and resources that can be used to augment your active shooter response planning efforts.

Important Note:
Workshop participants should be aware that this program will address situations that may be disturbing or uncomfortable to some individuals.

Tuition

Hospitals may use federal Hospital Preparedness Program (HPP) grant monies to help cover tuition and travel costs. Check with your HPP grant administrator (either the local health department or Emergency Medical Services agency) for details.

Full conference plus post-conference workshop:
Monday, Tuesday AND Wednesday………………………………$625

Full conference: Monday AND Tuesday…………………..$495

One day only: Monday OR Tuesday OR Wednesday….$295

Registrations received after August 19 are subject to an additional $100 tuition.

Tuition includes continental breakfasts, lunches, education sessions, exhibit show and reception, and continuing education. Onsite registrations and any unpaid registrations as of the date of the meeting will be charged an additional 10% fee.

Continuing Education

CE will be offered and attendees must sign in at each session at the
conference and include their state bar or professional license number,
if required.

Compliance — Application has been made to the Health Care Compliance
Certification Board for approval to award Health Care Compliance
Association continuing education for this program.

Health Care Executives — CHA is authorized to award up to 9 conference
hours and 5.75 post-conference hours of preapproved Category II
(non-ACHE) continuing education for this program toward the
advancement, recertification or reappointment in the American College
of Healthcare Executives.

Nursing — Provider approved by the California Board of Registered
Nursing, Provider #CEP 11924, for up to 10.8 conference contact hours
and 6.9 post-conference contact hours.

Risk Management — Application has been made to the American
Society for Healthcare Risk Management (ASHRM) for approval to award
continuing education toward fulfillment of the requirements of ASHRM
designations of FASHRM (Fellow) and DFASHRM (Distinguished Fellow),
and toward CPHRM renewal.

Confirmations

 

A confirmation will be e-mailed to all registrants.

Cancellation Policy

A $75 non-refundable processing fee will be retained for each cancellation received in writing by August 19. No refunds will be made after this date. Substitutions are encouraged. Cancellation and substitution notification may be faxed to (916) 552-7506, or e-mailed to education@calhospital.org.

Hotel

Host Hotel: Hyatt Regency Sacramento – SOLD OUT

Hyatt Regency Sacramento is the host hotel for the conference. Located in the heart of downtown Sacramento and directly across the street from the State Capitol, the Hyatt is close to numerous dining options, shopping and parks.

 

 

 


Hyatt Regency Sacramento
1209 L Street
Sacramento, CA 95814

Make your hotel reservations today. Rooms at the discounted rate are available on a first-come, first-serve basis and they are selling fast.

The Hyatt Regency Sacramento currently has rooms available at the rate of $172 for all nights during the conference. For reservations, call (888) 421-1442 and mention the “CHA Disaster Planning Conference.” The deadline for discounted sleeping rooms is August 19, but the discounted room block may sell out before the deadline.

To book a room online, click here.

Parking Information and Driving Directions

Sheraton Grand Hotel—ROOMS AVAILABLE

The Sheraton Grand Hotel currently has rooms available at the rate of $172 for all nights during the conference. For reservations, call (800) 325-3535 and mention the “CHA Disaster Planning Conference” or to book a room online, click here.

Reserve your room soon to guarantee the discounted rate. Only a limited number of rooms are available at this rate and the Sheraton could sell out.

The Sheraton is conveniently located across the street from the Sacramento Convention Center.

Sheraton Grand Hotel
1230 J Street
Sacramento, CA 95814

Sheraton Grand Directions

Important Note:
CHA has been advised that CDPH EPO will allow reimbursement for lodging at the conference at actual cost, up to the CHA-negotiated rate of $172 per night.

Best Practices Posters

Best practice displays were conceived as a way for members to share innovative ideas and model programs that can be replicated by other hospitals. By recognizing and highlighting the excellent work and unique contributions of our members, we celebrate our successes and support our ability to learn from each other.

Poster displays will be showcased in the exhibit hall and representatives from the hospitals will be on hand to discuss their best practice with attendees.

Congratulations to those best practice displays selected for this year’s conference:

American Red Cross – Partnership Opportunities with the Red Cross

California Hospital Medical Center – NICU Disaster Plan @ CHMC

Catholic Healthcare West – Emergency Preparedness & Security – Online Employee Education Program

CDPH/Kaiser – Hospital Shelter in Place and Evacuation Decisions for a Chemical Event

Cedars-Sinai Medical Center – Improving Hospital Staff Preparedness & Response to Radiation Emergencies

Children’s Hospital & Research Center Oakland – Aircraft Emergency Planning: Small Aircraft & Helicopter Incidents on Hospital Campus

Children’s Hospital & Research Center Oakland – 2011 Urban Shield: Community

College Hospital Costa Mesa – Volunteer amateur radio communications in hospital emergencies: A proven resource

Henry Mayo Newhall Memorial Hospital – Implementation of 2nd Generation CHA Standardized Emergency Codes

Kaiser Permanente, Panorama City & Woodland Hills – Mini Drills

Mills-Peninsula Health Services – Keeping it Real, even if it’s only an exercise

Oroville Hospital – Alternate Care Site Planning

Providence Health & Services, Valley Service Area – A DRC’s Approach to Multi-Hospital Mass Decontamination & Communication Drills

Riverside county Public Health Emergency Preparedness & Response Branch – Health/Medical Surge Planning Guidance Tool for the use of Surge Tents

Scripps Health – A coordinated health care response during a disaster: A specialized weapons and tactics (SWAT) team approach

Scripps Memorial Hospital – La Jolla – Decontamination Procedures

Sharp HealthCare – Active Shooter Table Top Exercise for Hospital Leadership and Law Enforcement

Shriner’s Hospitals for Children – HELP: Community Collaboration on Disaster Preparedness

Stanford Hospital & Clinics/Lucile Salter Packard Children’s Hospital – Implementing Emergency Response Teams in your Healthcare Facility

Sutter Health – STATREP: Department Status Report

Sutter Health – Incorporating the Lifecycle of an Event into HICS

Questions? Contact Lisa Sbragia Hartzell at (916) 552-7502 or lhartzell@calhospital.org.

Sponsors & Exhibitors

On behalf of the California Hospital Association, we would like to thank our corporate sponsors for their support of the 2011 Disaster Planning for California Hospitals Conference.

2011 Gold Sponsors
2011 Silver Sponsors

                                                

2011 Exhibitors to Date

  • 3M Company
  • Air Exchange, Inc.
  • Airgas
  • American Red Cross
  • ARC Products
  • Ascenttra, LLC
  • BioSeal Systems
  • BLU-MED Response Systems
  • CalEMA
  • California Poison Control System
  • California Volunteers
  • Cameron Bruce Associates
  • CaraFlow LLC
  • Concerro
  • Creative Safety Solutions, Inc.
  • Disaster Management Systems
  • DisastersNet/ReadyPoint Systems
  • DQE, Inc.
  • E-Bed System, A United Industry Co.
  • Emergency Medical Services Authority
  • ESi/WebEOC
  • ETC Building & Design, Quake Cottage Simulator
  • Evacusled, Inc.
  • Federal Signal
  • First Water Systems, Inc.
  • Global Protection
  • Guest Communications Corporation
  • HDT Global, Inc.
  • HeaterMeals
  • Icom America
  • ILC Dover
  • Image Sales, Inc.
  • ImageTrend, Inc.
  • Industrial Emergency Council (IEC)
  • Intermedix EMSystems
  • Landauer, Inc.
  • LiveProcess
  • Ludlum Measurements
  • MAXAIR Systems by Bio-Medical Devices Intl
  • More Prepared, LLC
  • Mortuary Response Solutions
  • Nestle Waters North America
  • Public Telephone
  • ProPac, Inc.
  • QuakeHOLD! Industrial
  • ReddiNet
  • RFI Communications and Security
  • Safety Center of America
  • Simpler Life Emergency Provisions
  • SOS Survival Products
  • Stericycle, Inc.
  • StopTech, Ltd.
  • Stryker
  • Survivor Industries
  • TelePath Corporation
  • TipNow in partnership with AVIRT
  • ToucanEd
  • TSI Incorporated
  • World Grocer

Sponsor our conference

Sponsorship opportunities are available with additional benefits including free and prime booth space at the exhibit show, conference registrations, free color advertising in the conference program, plenty of face time with the attendees and much more.

Exhibit at the conference

Showcase your product or service directly to hospitals by participating in the exhibit show. More than 800 people attended the 2010 conference and the Exhibit Show sold out. Don’t be left out of the largest hospital disaster planning conference in the west coast, apply today!

For more information or to download a sponsor/exhibitor packet,
click here. The application form can be completed on line, mailed or faxed to CHA.

Questions?

Contact Lisa Sbragia Hartzell at (916) 552-7502 or lhartzell@calhospital.org.


Conference Committee

This program was developed with the advice and input from the conference committee members who gave generously of their time.

Co-Chairs

Cheri Hummel, Vice President, Disaster Preparedness, California Hospital Association

Bethany Boom, Education/Hospital Preparedness Coordinator, California Hospital Association

Committee Members

Lisa Angell, Prehospital Care Coordinator, Pediatric Liaison Nurse and Staff Nurse IV, Watsonville Community Hospital and Hospital Preparedness Coordinator, California Hospital Association

Ryan Burgess, Hospital Preparedness Coordinator, California Hospital Association

Bernadette Burnes-Line, Administrative Director, Office of Emergency Management, Stanford Hospital and Clinics and Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital

Sharon Carlson, Director, Emergency Preparedness, Sharp Healthcare

Jeff Clingan, Director, Emergency Management, Palomar Pomerado Health

Kristina Freas, Director, Emergency Preparedness, Catholic Healthcare West

Hernando Garzon, MD, Emergency Medicine Physician, Kaiser Permanente Sacramento

Paulette Heitmeyer, Disaster Manager, Western Medical Center-Santa Ana

Loni Howard, Hospital Preparedness Coordinator, California Hospital Association and Emergency Preparedness Coordinator, Sutter Medical Center

AJ Johnson, Director, Quality and Accreditation, Shriners Northern California

Kurt Kainsinger, Disaster Resource Center Manager, UCLA Health System

Connie Lackey, Manager, Emergency Preparedness, Providence Saint Joseph & Holy Cross Medical Centers

Kathy Nacey, EMS and Emergency Preparedness Coordinator, Methodist Hospital

Andrew Petty, Chief Nursing Officer, Tehachapi Valley Healthcare District

Diane Rieke, Chief Nursing Officer, Trinity Hospital

Deborah J. Scaife, Infection Preventionist, Southern Humboldt Community Healthcare District

Georgann Smith, Emergency Preparedness Program Manager, Montclair Hospital Medical Center and San Dimas Community Hospital

Kathy Stevenson, Disaster Resource Center Manager, Children’s Hospital Los Angeles

Wendi Thomas, Nurse Manager, Emergency Department, Petaluma Valley Hospital

Dale Thompson, National Threat Assessment Manager, Kaiser Permanente

Caryn Thornburg, Emergency Preparedness and HAZMAT, ValleyCare Health System

Wendy VanCott, Prehospital Care Coordinator, Emergency Preparedness, Feather River Hospital

Dwight Williams, Safety/Security Supervisor, Washington Hospital

Commands